Tree Sparrow (Passer montanus)
Species
Tree Sparrow (Passer montanus). Adult. Taken at Bempton Cliffs, E. Yorks, on July 1st 2014.
Adult. Taken at Bempton Cliffs, E. Yorks, on July 1st 2014.
(1/200th sec at f13. Click image for larger version. © David Hastings)
Tree Sparrow (Passer montanus). Juvenile. Taken at Bempton Cliffs, E. Yorks, on July 1st 2014.
Juvenile. Taken at Bempton Cliffs, E. Yorks, on July 1st 2014.
(1/125th sec at f11. Click image for larger version. © David Hastings)

Description

L: 14 - 16 cm

Smaller than a House Sparrow and more active, with its tail almost permanently cocked. Adults have chestnut brown heads and napes (rather than grey), and white cheeks and collar with a contrasting black cheek-spot. The sexes are similar.

The main populations are found across the Midlands, southern and eastern England.

It breeds in open woodland, usually near cultivated land, but usually not in close proximity to humans.

Tree Sparrows, like other sparrows, are social birds.

The Tree Sparrow is a Red list species, having suffered a severe population decline since 1970. There are about 200000 breeding pairs in the UK.

Sightings

15-Nov-2018 : Extremadura, Spain (4)
23-Jul-2015 : Melnik, Bulgaria
21-Jul-2015 : Melnik, Bulgaria
01-Jul-2014 : Bempton Cliffs, E. Yorks